BREAK ARTS II Review

BREAK ARTS II is a mech-based racing game, which aims to combine heist-speed racing with action and customization. The game boasts some spectacular visual flare in its levels and there is a definite level of satisfaction when customizing the colour and appearance of mechs. Yet Despite it providing a serviceable racing experience, the game struggles with a lack of variety in its objectives and doesn’t provide quite enough tension or excitement to compete with other racing games.

Break Arts II’s gameplay takes place over a variety of race tracks split between the player and AI or online competitors. It isn’t a story-driven game and instead focuses on separate competitive races and activities. The game follows the same basic rules and objectives as many other racing games; move at lightning speed, be the first across the finish line, and try to stay on the track. Mechs are also equipped with a cannon on each arm, which players must use to fend off other players.

The game is split into several modes, which revolve around the same principle of racing. The game’s largest mode, Grand Prix, where the player must race against AI mechs in a large set of races, set in different environments. Depending on the positions they come after each race, players are rewarded with cash and their mechs gain additional levels that allow them to use more parts and modifications in the Garage. Players could also compete in quick races, which mostly serve as courses for beginners, at lower difficulty levels, and time trials, where players must try to break other player’s and AI scores. It’s an acceptable amount to take in and the races themselves are fun to take part in.

Alongside the races, the game comes with a separate customization area known as the Garage. Here, players could enhance their mechs abilities and physical appearance by removing parts and replacing them with others that would increase their stats. The Garage provides an exceptional amount of parts to choose from and almost all of them look excellent, and it’s definitely possible to make your mech look especially impressive in races. To customize mechs, players must select from a variety of lists compromising different traits and places around the mech’s body. Each piece can then be dragged-and-dropped, and if necessary rotated on the area of the player’s picking. Mechs though have a limited number of areas for enhancements and there is a limit to how many pieces can be placed. This helps prevent mechs from becoming overpowered and makes players put more thought into what they should use.

Unfortunately, the movement and feel of the mechs doesn’t feel as refined as in other racing games. Zipping across tracks like a jump-jet is an empowering feeling as you use your boosters, but moving at normal speed and turning corners feels under-developed and it takes away some of the fun and intensity of races. Additionally, the game’s use of audio is highly inconsistent. The score that plays during races is energetic and blends in well with the game’s style and pace. On the other hand, the music in other areas such as the Garage is much different and uses an out-of-place piano rift that doesn’t fit in well with the game, especially when compared with the rest of the score. Lastly, the announcer’s voice is overused and hearing phrases like ‘Energy levels are low’ during races quickly becomes distracting and repetitive.

The visuals are flashy and colourful and provide a tone of flare throughout the course of each race. The tracks themselves are filled with spectacular sights and while they are isolated and don’t have much in the background, they are nevertheless impressive to look at.

BREAK ARTS II is a beautiful and overall enjoyable racing game that should provide enough excitement for racing and mech enthusiasts. If you can look past the lack of creativity its race tracks and some frustrating features and mechanics, you may have a good time in the end.

REVIEW CODE: A complimentary PC code was provided to Bonus Stage for this review. Please send all review code enquiries to editor@bonusstage.co.uk.

Subscribe to our mailing list

Get the latest game reviews, news, features, and more straight to your inbox

error: Content protected by DMCA.