Frisky Business Review

Frisky Business is, for all intents and purposes, a visual novel with crime solving and dating elements. While this combination sounds promising, the presentation is far from it.

The one thing that immediately broke the game for me wasn’t even the overly massive knockers attached to the majority of the female characters, it was the lack of an opaque box beneath the text. In a visual novel. That meant that the white text was presented over the clothing of whoever was on-screen at the time and so it became progressively more difficult to read depending on what they were wearing. This was a very poor choice given the fact that the game is 99.9% reading and made it so that I had absolutely no desire to replay the game to get the other endings.

The game is played with your mouse. You click, read, click some more–and sometimes you get a dialogue option or three which will affect the ladies’ willingness to bend over backwards for you. More on that awkward little tidbit later.

You play as Falco Frisk, PI, owner of the titular “Frisky Business” alongside your partner Charlie. The former is a silver-tongued playboy with suave good looks and the latter is a hapless nerd whose brilliance is outshined by his awkwardness. These archetypes and more are found throughout the game: the hard ass female cop; the buxom blonde with more boob than brain; the fiery Latina that, for some reason, throws Spanish words into her speech as though to remind us that she’s Spanish–you get the idea.

The circumstances during which these characters meet are as such: there’s a madman on the loose and, at first, it seems he’s just a loon dressed as a clown until you realize that there’s something much darker going on here. The police brush off the stalker as a harmless prankster and so it’s up to you and Charlie to protect the three young women who are being heckled. Because why not?

The game is divided into chapters–11 in all–and will take you roughly an hour to complete. During that hour, you’ll spend a bit of time trying to figure out who the clown-faced criminal is, but mostly you’ll hit on college-aged women. Badly. Seriously, most of Falco’s lines would get an actual male kneed in the groin, but somehow the airheads in this game find him “clever AND funny” as one girl called him.

I didn’t buy it.

And that was my problem with the entire Frisky experience: I didn’t buy the dialogue that relied way too heavily on the clichéd character of the speaker, I didn’t buy the fact that Falco, a supposed investigative professional, spent WAY more time seducing his wards than protecting them, and I especially didn’t buy the fact that the game ended on what seemed to be a “to be continued” without even revealing the identity of the guy we spent the entire game trying to stop. The ending was so anticlimactic it seemed that the developer was acknowledging the fact that the plot was merely a poorly contrived excuse for Frisky to meet a bunch of women who he could set about seducing.

The investigative aspects of the game allowed you to look at the evidence you’ve accumulated to gain information from Charlie, question the girls, and follow leads. Even if you skip these things the plot will move right on as though you didn’t, so you’re free to chase skirts.

The “dating” aspect of this game would have been all well and fine if it had been even the slightest bit realistic. I managed to engage in a threesome during my first playthrough and it was as easy as inviting the two ladies over to my place after taking the time to first bang one girl. It was like the other girl, who I had flirted with on one other occasion by telling her she had a pretty name and nice jugs–just gave in… again, because why not?

Frisky Business paints women in a bad light. I’m sure that’s no surprise to you given that the Store Page is covered in women with unbelievably large breasts wearing next to nothing, but the pickup lines used and the reactions they receive scream rapey male fantasy. As a woman myself, I was a insulted by just how easily these girls put out and how much sleaze they put up with.

Near the end of each woman’s dating path, you have the option to sleep with her. Don’t get too excited as the mini game for the act is more than a little awkward. It consists of your partner in question in a static, sexual pose with you rubbing your cursor, which becomes a banana for whatever reason, over the sensitive bits of the female anatomy until a heart in the top left corner fills up. This will take 30 seconds at most, after which your partner presumably reaches climax with a single, awkward moan. I’m no stranger to these type of mini games and after playing Monster Monpiece, which uses the same system, or HuniePop, which has a lot more vocal response, Frisky Business’s mini game left me feeling… dirty.

.Pros.

  • The plot wasn’t bad; I just wish it had been fleshed out as much as the endowments of the female characters had been.
  • The music suited the scenes well.
  • Achievements for finishing the game in different ways..Cons.
  • No text box. White text over a detailed background comprised of several colours–including white!–is hell to read.
  • No option to skip text you’ve already read or fast forward. These are also standard features of visual novels.
  • The rapey vibe of Falco’s pickup lines.`
  • Falco’s face. His eyes cross in one of his default expressions and it just looks silly.
  • A poor representation of women even for video game standards.
  • Archetypical characters and a predictable plot.
  • Dialogue options boil down to “Be a douche” or “Be nice.” The outcome is very obvious.
  • About an hour of gameplay depending on how quickly you read.
  • Awkward sex mini game where you rub the mouse (the cursor became a banana for whatever reason) on different parts of the girl for about 30 seconds.
  • An anticlimactic ending. Why spend all that time trying a solve a mystery that could never be solved?
  • The writing isn’t interesting enough to encourage the subsequent playthrough necessary to get the rest of the achievements. There’s no manual save ability, so you can’t save scum either.

.Bottom Line.
If you’re looking for a cheap, titillating experience, skip this one. It’s not worth the headache of trying to read the white text without a solid text box nor is it worth the cringe-worthy sex mini game you’re “rewarded” with after hitting on a girl with lines you’ll probably never ever hear from an actual human being.

This game was made by a developer who made two titles prior to it that revolved around poop (There’s Poop in My Soup and Super Duper Party Pooper). That should be pretty indicative of the sort of content you’ll find in Frisky Business.

Bonus Stage Rating - Poor 3/10
REVIEW CODE: A complimentary PC code was provided to Bonus Stage for this review. Please send all review code enquiries to editor@bonusstage.co.uk.

Subscribe to our mailing list

Get the latest game reviews, news, features, and more straight to your inbox

error: Content protected by DMCA.